British Values

Promoting British Values

The Department for Education have recently reinforced the need “to create and enforce a clear and rigorous expectation on all schools to promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs”.

 

At Greenacres Primary School these values are reinforced regularly and in the following ways:

 

Democracy

Pupils have the opportunity to have their voices heard through our School council, pupil questionnaires, class charters, suggestion boxes and pupil voice work. We encourage an open door policy where the children feel free and able to visit the head teacher and other members of staff with their ideas and suggestions. This is linked to our work on UNICEF’s Rights respecting schools award (RRSA) and the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC) Article 37.

 

The Rule of Law

The importance of Laws, whether they be those that govern the class, the school, or the country, are consistently reinforced throughout school, especially during assemblies and when dealing with behaviour. Pupils are taught the value and reasons behind laws, that they govern and protect us, the responsibilities that this involves and the consequences when laws are broken. We organise and encourage visits from authorities such as the Community Support officer; Police; Fire service and magistrates. These help us to reinforce this message. This is linked to our work on UNICEF’s Right Respecting School Award (RRSA) and the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC) Article 37.

 

Individual Liberty

Within school, pupils are actively encouraged to make choices, knowing that they are in a safe and supportive environment. As a school we educate and provide boundaries for young pupils to make choices confidently and safely. Pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and are advised on how to exercise these safely. This is explored, for example, through our e-safety curriculum, PSHE lessons, Young Enterprise scheme and by the provision of a variety of cross-curricular opportunities. Children are taught specific skills which enable them to make the best choice of challenge, both during lessons and home learning, to make them independent learners. Throughout the academic year, pupils are offered the opportunity to participate in numerous extra-curricular clubs, workshops and events which allow them to exercise their individual choice. This is linked to our work on UNICEF’s Rights Respecting School Award (RRSA) and the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC) Articles 12, 15 and 29 by which children are encouraged to pursue individual ambition and goals, whilst respecting the views and choices of others.

 

Mutual Respect

Part of our school ethos, as set out in our Mission Statement and outlined in the school Behaviour policy, revolves around the key principles of RRSA. Pupils have been part of discussions and assemblies related to what this means and how it is shown. Displays around the school promote these values and increase the children’s knowledge of the importance of mutual respect – in school, our local community, nationally and in the wider world. This is reiterated in our class charters, as well as in our behaviour policy, and is linked to our work on UNICEF’s Rights Respecting School Award (RRSA) and the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC) Articles 14 and 30.

 

Tolerance of those of different Faiths and Beliefs

This is achieved through developing pupils’ understanding of their place in a culturally diverse society and by giving them opportunities to experience such diversity. Our RE and PSHE curriculum have designated topic areas to focus on other faiths and beliefs. Assemblies, themed weeks and workshops offer pupils enriched experiences to deepen their understanding, tolerance and knowledge of our culturally diverse society. The school celebrates the many languages spoken by our pupils, e.g. through sharing prayers in assemblies, visitors, trips, language clubs and festivals. Members of different faiths and religions are made welcome and are encouraged to share their knowledge to enhance learning within classes and the school. This is linked to our work on UNICEF’s Rights Respecting School Award and the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC) Articles 14 and 30.